Feed on
Posts
Comments

September 2017

In this month’s newsletter:

  • tree talk

  • food festival

  • tree walk

  • apple pressing day

  • rivers week

 

Trees and and climate change

This month’s green drinks discussion:

How did our woodlands evolve? Where did our town and garden trees come from? What will happen to them as the climate changes? Is climate change the bigggest threat to our trees? Why are trees important to our future? What trees should we be planting now for tomorrow?

Thursday 7 September, led by Clive Davidson

7.30pm in the cafe area upstairs at The Station House, opposite Haslemere station. Parking is available behind the building.

* Note this is a new venue for green drinks

October green drinks:

Running a small market garden – Thursday 5 October, led by Ed Brooks

Food festival

We will be participating in the Haslemere Food Festival on Lion Green on Saturday 23rd September. Come and try our homemade soup made with vegetables from our allotment, accompanied by a slice a bread from Imbhams Granary.

 

Tree walk

We will lead a notable trees of the town walk as part of the Haslemere Walking Festival from 10.30am till 12.30pm on Saturday 30th September. For more information contact info@transitionhaslemere.org or call Haslemere Visitor Information Centre on 01428 645425 to book.

 

Community apple pressing day

Saturday 30th September 10.30am-4pm, National Trust Swan Barn Farm.

Bring your apples and learn how to make apple juice and cider. Or if you don’t have any, just come along to join in the fun and help with ours. A family-friendly event where you can learn how to deal with the apple harvest. We will be chopping, scratting and pressing apples and teaching people how to make their own cider. The local Ranger team will be on hand to answer your fruit tree pruning and other apple related questions as well.

 

Link of the month – Rivers Week

Starting on September 16th, Surrey Wildlife Trust is hosting a week of events, walks and talks sponsored by Thames Water, culminating in World Rivers Day on Sunday September 24. Whether you are a keen river user, an active conservationist, or a family who simply enjoys a riverside walk, there will be an event to interest you. For more information, see:

http://surreywildlifetrust.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=49a562c0c3de3ff302b6a2593&id=d6b01dbab4&e=7918990487

Tree corner: Coastal redwood

Coastal redwood (Sequioa sempervirens) is a native of California and Oregon where it takes in part of its water requirements from the frequent fogs. It has spongy red fire-proof bark and small round cones attached to the tips of the leaf shoots. Now that the biggest Douglas firs and eucalyptus specimens have been felled, the world’s tallest living trees are coastal redwoods.

The tree in the photo is in the garden of the Haslemere Museum and will be featured in the tree walk on Saturday 30 September – see details above.

August 2017

This month’s events:

  • Green drinks topic: Trees and climate change

  • join us for the annual tree walk

  • Community allotment update

  • Food festival, and more!

Green drinks topic this month: Trees and and climate change

How did our woodlands evolve? Where did our town and garden trees come from? What will happen to them as the climate changes? Is climate change the biggest threat to our trees? Why are trees important to our future? What trees should we be planting now for tomorrow?
Thursday 7 September, led by Clive Davidson

October green drinks topic:
Running a small market garden
 
– Thursday 5 October, led by Ed Brooks

Both events will be at 7.30pm in the cafe area upstairs at The Station House, opposite Haslemere station. Parking is available behind the building.
* Note this is a new venue for green drinks

Food festival

We will be participating in the Haslemere Food Festival on Lion Green on Saturday 23rd September. Come and try our homemade soup made with vegetables from our allotment, accompanied by a slice a bread from Imbhams Granary.

Tree walk

We will lead a notable trees of the town walk as part of the Haslemere Walking Festival from 10.30am till 12.30pm on Saturday 30th September. For more information contact info@transitionhaslemere.org or call Haslemere Visitor Information Centre on 01428 645425 to book.

Community allotment – summer harvesting now

The allotment is thriving in our usual summer weather of sun interspersed with plenty of rain. These conditions suit some vegetables but not others. We have been harvesting plenty of curly kale, leaf beet, spinach, Swiss chard, parsley, pole beans, snap/mange-tout peas, carrots, beetroot and one cucumber. As the summer crops finish the beds will be cleared and some autumn/winter crops planted. If you like to join our community allotment group please sign up for our TH Allotment Updates here.

Link of the month – Transition Network

Transition Haslemere is part of a wider network of community groups developing local responses to the challenges of climate change and long-term sustainability. You can find out about the history of the movement, its underlying philosophy and what the many other groups worldwide are up to at:

https://transitionnetwork.org/

Tree corner: Cedar of the Lebanon

Cedar of the Lebanon (Cedrus libani) is a majestic evergreen conifer native to the eastern Mediterranean. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th Century and planted in the gardens of many mansions and stately homes. The tree pictured is in Redwood Manor, Tanners Lane, and is recorded as 250 years old. Its sheltered position means that it has survived the weather better than many specimens and is one of the most magnificent and elegant trees in the town. It will be featured in the Notable Trees of Haslemere walk on Saturday 30 September – see above for details.

July 2017

  • Transition Haslemere BBQ

  • September events

  • Transition Haslemere community allotment

  • and more!

    Transition Haslemere BBQ – all welcome

    We will be holding our summer barbecue at the National Trust’s Swan Barn Farm, Collards Lane, on Friday July 14th 2017 from 6.30pm. All welcome!
    Bring your own food and drink. The National Trust provide the fire and the view, we all provide the conversation. If you missed our green drinks talks, come by and ask questions, or simply enjoy a summer social evening in a lovely setting.

    We will also take a stroll to look at our community allotment nearby.

    Green drinks topic September: Trees and and climate change

    How did our woodlands evolve? Where did our town and garden trees come from? What will happen to them as the climate changes? Is climate change the biggest threat to our trees? Why are trees important to our future? What trees should we be planting now for tomorrow?

    Thursday 7 September, led by Clive Davidson, at 7.30pm at Royal Oak, Critchmere Lane.

    October green drinks:
    Running a small market garden
     – Thursday 5 October, led by Ed Brooks, AKA Eds Veg

    Food festival and tree walk

    We will be participating in the Haslemere Food Festival on Lion Green on Saturday 23rd September and leading a notable trees of the town walk as part of the Haslemere Walking Festival on Saturday 28th September. More details in future newsletters.

    Community allotment – harvesting now


    Would you like to join our community allotment group? Whether you are an old hand at growing vegetables or have no prior experience, we look forward to meeting you! To find out more, please sign up for our TH Allotment Updates here.

    Link of the month – Hard to recycle waste programmes

    Free national recycling programmes for typically hard-to-recycle waste, such as babyfood pouches, writing implements and biscuit wrappers. The idea is one person collects enough to send a package freepost to the recyclers. Transition Haslemere is contemplating becoming a ‘hub’ for some materials.

    www.terracycle.co.uk/en-UK/brigades

    Tree corner: sweet chestnut

    The sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa) is conspicuous at this time of the year as the male catkins adorn the trees like a shower of pale green starbursts. The female flowers are quite small and can only be seen close up. Sweet chestnut is native to southern Europe, western Asia and north Africa and is thought to have been brought to Britain by the Romans. It coppices well and its wood is versatile and is still used for fencing, roof shingles, furniture and ecobuilding. It has distinctively large leaves with widely spaced teeth. Haslemere has many sweet chestnut woods, some still coppiced, others overgrown and neglected.

    The photo shows an avenue of sweet chestnuts alongside the Haslemere Recreation Ground.

June 2017

In this month’s newsletter

  • summer barbecue

  • future green drinks topics and events

  • community allotment

  • and more!

Summer BBQ – all welcome

We will be holding our summer barbecue at the National Trust’s Swan Barn Farm, Collards Lane, on Friday July 14th 2017 from 6.30pm. All welcome!
Bring your own food and drink. The National Trust provide the fire and the view, we all provide the conversation. If you missed our green drinks talks, come by and ask questions, or simply enjoy a summer social evening in a lovely setting.

We will also take a stroll to look at our community allotment nearby.
(Note that this is in place of our usual monthly green drinks.)

Trees and market gardening

Future themes for our green drinks are:

Trees and climate change – Thursday 7 September, led by Clive Davidson
Running a small market garden – Thursday 5 October, led by Ed Brooks
Both events will be at 7.30pm at Royal Oak, Critchmere Lane.

Food festival and tree walk

We will be participating in the Haslemere Food Festival on Lion Green on Saturday 23rd September and leading a notable trees of the town walk as part of the Haslemere Walking Festival on Saturday 28th September. More details in future newsletters.

Community allotment – it’s growing season


Would you like to join our community allotment group? Whether you are an old hand at growing vegetables or have no prior experience, we look forward to meeting you! To find out more, please sign up for our TH Allotment Updates here.

Discounted composters

Surrey County Council got in touch with us after our item in last month’s newsletter to point out that they offer discounted compost bins, including Green Johannas and Green Cones, as well as advice on composting on their website at www.recycleforsurrey.org.uk/garden-waste/composting

Link of the month – Paris Agreement

President Trump recently withdrew the United States from the Paris Agreement, which brings all nations “into a common cause to undertake ambitious efforts to combat climate change and adapt to its effects, with enhanced support to assist developing countries to do so.” You can find out all about it at:
http://unfccc.int/paris_agreement/items/9485.php

Tree corner: False acacia

The false acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia) is known as the black locust in its native eastern United States, where its vanilla scented, pea type flowers are an important source of nectar for honeybees. Although it does not like shade, it can grow in dry poor soils. Its wood is valued for its hardness, strength and rot resistance, and was important for shipbuilding. Its pinnate leaves (similar to a rowan) fold together in the wet and at night, and there are a pair of thorns at the base of the stalk.

The false acacia in the photo is on the corner of West Street near Waitrose.

May 2017

In this month’s newsletter:

  • keeping chickens
  • allotment update
  • compost advice
  • and more

Keeping chickens in the garden

A talk for beginners by Jane Devlin, and our theme for June’s green drinks. Find out about the costs, practicalities, why keeping chickens is a good for the environment, what to avoid, and how to cope with common problems. Also, we will answer once and for all the question of which came first – the chicken or the egg? Thursday 1 June, 7.30pm, Royal Oak, Critchmere Hill (talk begins around 8.30pm).

Future activities and themes for our green drinks are:
Summer barbeque – Friday 14 July, Swan Barn – all welcome!
July’s green drinks will be combined with our summer barbecue, on Friday 14 July from 6.30pm at Swan Barn, where the theme will be enjoying ourselves. All welcome. Bring your own food and drink. We provide the fire; the National Trust provides the view.

Trees and climate change – Thursday 7 September, led by Clive Davidson
Running a small market garden – Thursday 5 October, led by Ed Brooks

Bee inspired

“Keeping bees is the most beneficial thing you can do for the countryside”, said Dave Elliott, National Trust head ranger of Black Down, in his talk on beekeeping at our recent green drinks. We need honey bees to pollinate our crops, vegetables, trees and flowers. And because they are under threat, bees need us. Working with a hive is a “joy” said Dave, and it less difficult to set up and maintain than you might think. You can read more about Dave’s talk and how to set up a hive here.

Community allotment – it’s planting season

Would you like to join our community allotment group? Whether you are an old hand at growing vegetables or have no prior experience, we look forward to meeting you! To find out more, please sign up for our TH Allotment group or check for updates here.
Also, we would be happy to receive further garden tools, watering cans, plastic trays for seedlings, roof felt and guttering (excellent for pea seedlings). Let us know if you have any to offer or want to join us by emailing us at info@transitionhaslemere.org.

Confused about composting?

Waverley Council’s recent sticker on our rubbish bins about food waste seems to have caused a bit of confusion. Some people who compost all their kitchen waste have wondered whether it is directed at them since they don’t put out a green food waste caddy. Their attempts to find out from Waverley whether there are any foodstuffs that should not be composted at home have not had much success. The answer is that, with the right methods and equipment, all food waste, including cooked food, bones and left-overs can be composted. You can find out more here.

Invest in future farms
The Ecological Land Co-operative is a social enterprise established to address the lack of affordable sites for ecological land-based livelihoods in England. Set up in 2009, the ELC purchases land, obtains planning permission, and installs the infrastructure to create smallholdings for future growers. The ELC has launched a public share offer to raise funds for the creation of two new clusters of small farms. For more information: www.ethex.org.uk/ecologicalland

Link of the month – random acts of wildness
Surrey Wildlife Trust, along with other Trusts, is encouraging everyone to put aside a little time each day in June to do something for nature. Its Random Act of Wildness scheme offers a pack of ideas and encouragement, with lots suggestions for young people. For more information see www.mywildlife.org.uk/30dayswild

Tree corner: English elm

Although magnificent mature English elms (Ulmus minor ‘Atinia’) have largely disappeared from the landscape as a result of Dutch elm disease, they can still be found locally in hedgerows and occasionally in woodland. Often, they only make it to around 15 foot or so, which is roughly the height at which the disease-carrying beetle flies. A small group of elms in the woods off Killinghurst Lane has escaped the beetle’s attention, with the tallest now around 35 feet – pictured. If you want to see mature elms, visit Brighton or Eastbourne. The latter has 10,000, which line many of its streets and parks.

Older Posts »